Kroger’s Bad Customer Service Starts From The Top

I’ve been a long-time shopper at Kroger grocery stores in the Houston, Texas area.  I’ve always found them to be cleaner and a little more welcoming than the other two major stores (HEB and Randall’s).

However, recently I’ve noticed a sharp decline in customer service, cleanliness, and overall quality and this weekend I found a big reason why. 

As I entered Kroger a sign at the Customer Service counter that said “Our Goal” grabbed my attention so I went over for a closer examination.

The sign was relating to the store’s customer satisfaction rating, which was 70% according to the sign.  That means that 3 out of every 10 customers leave the store unsatisfied.  To me that is horrible.  However, as I looked closer at the sign, apparently 70% is outstanding in the eyes of Kroger’s management. 

The customer satisfaction goal as stated on the sign was 67%.  If this doesn’t appaul you it should.

Kroger is telling it’s loyal customers that if 33 out of every 100 customers leave the store unsatisfied, that’s good enough for them.

What is this world coming to if that is ok?

I thought this was a single store goal so I chalked it up to a bad store manager, but when I visisted a second Kroger store, the goal was the same, 67%.   This particular Kroger had fallen short of that goal with a 43% posted satisfaction rate.

This is pathetic and it starts from the top.  If Kroger doesn’t care enough about its stores and customers to set their satisfaction goals higher than 67%, then they are losing a customer.

What happened to the good ole days when stores strived for 100% satisfaction? 

As a retailer, when you say that you are ok if 1/3 of your customers leave unsatisfied, you’re saying that you do not care about your customers.  Your saying that if a customer doesn’t like it, they can go somewhere else. 

Well guess what Kroger, you got it.  Call me when you care about my business.

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